The Road to Web 3.0

25 10 2009

Road to Web 3.0

Out of all the Internet buzzwords and jargon that have made the transition to the public consciousness, “Web 2.0” might be the best known. Even though a lot of people have heard about it, not many have any idea what Web 2.0 means. Some people claim that the term itself is nothing more than a marketing ploy designed to convince venture capitalists to invest millions of dollars into Web sites. It’s true that when Dale Dougherty of O’Reilly Media came up with the term, there was no clear definition. There wasn’t even any agreement about if there was a Web 1.0.

Some Examples of the Hottest Web 2.0 tools in the market:

facebooktwitter_logoyoutube-logo

Other people insist that Web 2.0 is a reality. In brief, the characteristics of Web 2.0 include:

  • The ability for visitors to make changes to Web pages: Amazon allows visitors to post product reviews. Using an online form, a visitor can add information to Amazon’s pages that future visitors will be able to read.
  • Using Web pages to link people to other users: Social Networking sites like Facebook and MySpace are popular in part because they make it easy for users to find each other and keep in touch.
  • Fast and efficient ways to share content; Youtube is the perfect example. YouTube member can create a video and upload it to the site for others to watch in less than an hour.
  • New ways to get information: Today, Internet surfers can subscribe to a Web page’s Really Simple Syndication (RSS) feeds and receive notifications of that Web page’s updates as long as they maintain an Internet connection.
  • Expanding access to the Internet beyond the computer: Many people access the Internet through devices like cell phones or video game consoles; before long, some experts expect that consumers will access the Internet through television sets and other devices.

Just think of Web 1.0 as a library. You can use it as a source of information, but you can’t contribute to or change the information in any way.

While Web 2.0 is more like a big group of friends and acquaintances, which you can still use it to receive information, also can contribute to the conversation and make it a richer experience.

There are still many people trying to get a grip on Web 2.0, others are already beginning to think about what comes next.

Some experts believe that the foundation for Web 3.0 will be application-programming interfaces (APIs). An API is an interface designed to allow developers to create applications that take advantage of a certain set of resources. Many Web 2.0 sites include APIs that give programmers access to the sites’ unique data and capabilities. For example, Facebook’s API allows developers to create programs that use Facebook as a staging ground for games, quizzes, product reviews and more.

One Web 2.0 trend that could help the development of Web 3.0 is the mashup. A mashup is the combination of two or more applications into a single application. For example, a developer might combine a program that lets users review restaurants with Google Maps. The new mashup application could show not only restaurant reviews, but also map them out so that the user could see the restaurants’ locations. Some Internet experts believe that creating mashups will be so easy in Web 3.0 that anyone will be able to do it.

What do you think about the rise of Web 3.0 ?

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Evolution Web 1.0, Web 2.0 to Web 3.0

24 10 2009

webevolution

Web 1.0 – That Geocities & Hotmail era was all about read-only content and static HTML websites. People preferred navigating the web through link directories of Yahoo! and dmoz.

Web 2.0 – This is about user-generated content and the read-write web. People are consuming as well as contributing information through blogs or sites like Flickr, YouTube, Digg, etc. The line dividing a consumer and content publisher is increasingly getting blurred in the Web 2.0 era.

Web 3.0 – This will be about semantic web (or the meaning of data), personalization (e.g. iGoogle), intelligent search and behavioral advertising among other things.

If that sounds confusing, check out some of these excellent presentations that help you understand Web 3.0 in simple English. Each takes a different approach to explain Web 3.0 and the last presentation uses an example of a “postage stamp” to explain the “semantic web”.





The Social Media Revolution

24 10 2009

A quick sumup of key points:

  • 1 of 8couples in the US meet via social media
  • Facebook added 100 Million new users in 9 months, it took radio 38years to reach that audience
  • If Facebook was a country, it would be the worlds 4th largest
  • Ashton Kutcher has more followers on Twitter than the entire population of Ireland, or Norway
  • 25% of search results for the world’s largest brands are links to user generated content
  • We no longer search for news or products, they find us through social media
  • More than 1.5 billion items are shared on Facebook – per day!
  • ‘Its a people driven economy’ — Erik Qualman, 2009
  • The new paradigm: “Listening first, selling second”




How Will Social Media Make History

24 10 2009

Clay Shirky manages to picture and explain the impact of the Internet on our social structures in easy words and with compelling examples.

  • Internet is the first platform that allows both group-building/management & conversation.
  • Media that is good at creating conversations (e.g. phone) is no good at creating groups; media that’s good at creating groups is no good at creating conversations. The Internet is the first medium that has native support for groups and conversations at the same time.
  • The Internet also becomes the main carrier for all other media. Never thought about it like this before but it makes complete sense. The Internet is also a Meta Medium.
  • As for now consumers become producer, but I like Clay’s analogy on this one: “It is as if you bought a book, they threw in the printing press for free”.
  • Using the last big Chinese earthquake as an example, he demonstrates why in a new media landscape, where the news is not only produced by so called “professionals” it will become increasingly difficult for countries to censor the Internet. Media is produced locally, quickly, by amateurs and at an incredible abundance, which makes it practically uncontrollable.
  • Times of classic sender and receiver models are over, we are increasingly in an environment where media is global, social, ubiquitous and cheap.
  • Convene your supporters, don’t control them and never try to hide conversation, e.g. delete negative replies. They happen whether you like it or not. So deal with them appropriately.
  • Media is less sending a message to an individual, but about creating an environment for convening and supporting groups. Well, I guess that sums it up nicely. I couldn’t agree more.