Web 3.0 = (4C + P + VS)

25 10 2009

Web 3.0 = (4C + P + VS)

Sramana Mitra has submitted this formula for the future: Web 3.0 = (4C + P + VS).       (I have created a equation diagram for a better view of the formula)

4c = Content, Commerce, Community, Context

P = Personalization

VS = Vertical Search

Web 2.0 has been a nichy phenomenon with hundred and thousands of microcap efforts addressing one of the Cs, lately, Community being the most popular force, producing companies like MySpace, Facebook, Piczo, Xanga, and Flixster.

In Web 1.0, Commerce had been the driving force, that produced companies like Netflix,BlueNile, Amazon, and eBAY. It had also resulted in the Dotcom meltdown.

The same period that is seeing the surge of Web 2.0, has also seen a great deal of investment in Vertical Search, like Sidestep for Travel.

Personalization has remained limited to some unsatisfactory efforts by the MyYahoo team, their primary disadvantage being the lack of a starting Context. More recently, Netvibes has raised a lot of buzz, but also lacks the same organizing principle: Context.

In Web 3.0, I predict, we are going to start seeing roll-ups. We will see a trunk that emerges from the Context, be it film (Netflix), music (iTunes), cooking / food, working women, single parents, … and assembles the Web 3.0 formula that addresses the whole set of needs of a consumer in that Context.

I will make an example of what she means by Web 3.0 = (4C + P + VS).

Now you got to imagine that,

  1. There is a pretty woman, dark skinned, dark haired, brown eyed. I have a distinct personal style, and only certain designers resonate with it (Context).
  2. She wants her personal David Jones which carries clothes by those designers, in my size (Commerce).
  3. She wants her personal Vogue magazine that covers articles about that Style, those Designers, and other emerging ones like them (Content).
  4. She wants to exchange notes with others of my size-shape-style-psychographic and discover what else looks good. She also wanted a recommendation system telling her what they’re buying (Community).
  5. There’s also some basic principles of what looks good based on skin tone, body shape, hair color, eye color and etc. She wants the search engine to be able to filter and match based on an algorithm that builds in this knowledge base (Personalization, Vertical Search).

Now, image the same for process as above for a short, fat man, who doesn’t really have a sense of what to wear. And he doesn’t have a wife or a girl-friend. Before Web 3.0, he could go to the personal shopper at David Jones.

With Web 3.0, the Internet will be his Personal Shopper.





The Road to Web 3.0

25 10 2009

Road to Web 3.0

Out of all the Internet buzzwords and jargon that have made the transition to the public consciousness, “Web 2.0” might be the best known. Even though a lot of people have heard about it, not many have any idea what Web 2.0 means. Some people claim that the term itself is nothing more than a marketing ploy designed to convince venture capitalists to invest millions of dollars into Web sites. It’s true that when Dale Dougherty of O’Reilly Media came up with the term, there was no clear definition. There wasn’t even any agreement about if there was a Web 1.0.

Some Examples of the Hottest Web 2.0 tools in the market:

facebooktwitter_logoyoutube-logo

Other people insist that Web 2.0 is a reality. In brief, the characteristics of Web 2.0 include:

  • The ability for visitors to make changes to Web pages: Amazon allows visitors to post product reviews. Using an online form, a visitor can add information to Amazon’s pages that future visitors will be able to read.
  • Using Web pages to link people to other users: Social Networking sites like Facebook and MySpace are popular in part because they make it easy for users to find each other and keep in touch.
  • Fast and efficient ways to share content; Youtube is the perfect example. YouTube member can create a video and upload it to the site for others to watch in less than an hour.
  • New ways to get information: Today, Internet surfers can subscribe to a Web page’s Really Simple Syndication (RSS) feeds and receive notifications of that Web page’s updates as long as they maintain an Internet connection.
  • Expanding access to the Internet beyond the computer: Many people access the Internet through devices like cell phones or video game consoles; before long, some experts expect that consumers will access the Internet through television sets and other devices.

Just think of Web 1.0 as a library. You can use it as a source of information, but you can’t contribute to or change the information in any way.

While Web 2.0 is more like a big group of friends and acquaintances, which you can still use it to receive information, also can contribute to the conversation and make it a richer experience.

There are still many people trying to get a grip on Web 2.0, others are already beginning to think about what comes next.

Some experts believe that the foundation for Web 3.0 will be application-programming interfaces (APIs). An API is an interface designed to allow developers to create applications that take advantage of a certain set of resources. Many Web 2.0 sites include APIs that give programmers access to the sites’ unique data and capabilities. For example, Facebook’s API allows developers to create programs that use Facebook as a staging ground for games, quizzes, product reviews and more.

One Web 2.0 trend that could help the development of Web 3.0 is the mashup. A mashup is the combination of two or more applications into a single application. For example, a developer might combine a program that lets users review restaurants with Google Maps. The new mashup application could show not only restaurant reviews, but also map them out so that the user could see the restaurants’ locations. Some Internet experts believe that creating mashups will be so easy in Web 3.0 that anyone will be able to do it.

What do you think about the rise of Web 3.0 ?





Evolution Web 1.0, Web 2.0 to Web 3.0

24 10 2009

webevolution

Web 1.0 – That Geocities & Hotmail era was all about read-only content and static HTML websites. People preferred navigating the web through link directories of Yahoo! and dmoz.

Web 2.0 – This is about user-generated content and the read-write web. People are consuming as well as contributing information through blogs or sites like Flickr, YouTube, Digg, etc. The line dividing a consumer and content publisher is increasingly getting blurred in the Web 2.0 era.

Web 3.0 – This will be about semantic web (or the meaning of data), personalization (e.g. iGoogle), intelligent search and behavioral advertising among other things.

If that sounds confusing, check out some of these excellent presentations that help you understand Web 3.0 in simple English. Each takes a different approach to explain Web 3.0 and the last presentation uses an example of a “postage stamp” to explain the “semantic web”.